Research and testing are your best shot to prevent your project from going over budget.

Welcome to the UX Myth blog series, where I debunk common design misunderstandings you keep hearing about in product meetings (and attempting to fix them).

If I Can Use It. Our Users Can Figure It Out

In February 2010, Google launched a social network for Gmail called Google Buzz. They tested it with 20,000 google employees in a closed beta and the project was launched later that year. They ended up receiving mountains of complaints — so much so that they decided to discontinue the service a year and a half later, in December 2011.


Hear Hear, put those downward arrow buttons away, let’s talk.

Welcome to the UX Myth blog series, where I debunk common design misunderstandings you keep hearing about in product meetings (and attempting to fix them).

Quick links to my previous UX myth #1 #2

Fit Everything On Top or “Above The Fold”

The term “Above the fold” derives from the way a newspaper is physically folded together. Editors highly regarded these areas as the main hero for enticing readers. Any topic that could interest them would be put in these areas, aiming to grab as much attention as possible when walking past the newsstand.


The end is nigh, and so are your manually-measuring-a-button-padding habit

Mastering the art of dynamic auto-expanding components in Figma could be daunting. The way it works is a bit different and could hinder you from becoming the responsive god that you have always longed to be.

I won’t cover the basics here, though.

The most common issues usually stem from the misconception about how auto layout and constraints work in Figma. I won’t delve too deeply into the topic as there are many video tutorials (even from Figma itself) that explain it better than I am able to.

Knowing the difference is crucial for navigating through your work as a…


How we approach the basics of building a comprehensive design system when facing tight deadlines.

An orange-coloured cover image with the following headers “A Quick Guide for Setting Up A Design System — Figma Edition”
An orange-coloured cover image with the following headers “A Quick Guide for Setting Up A Design System — Figma Edition”

Let’s take a closer look at how we can (and should) implement our design systems to lighten the load of keeping all elements organised as well as better onboarding for other designers.

As mentioned previously in my other articles, having an ‘explain once, works everywhere’ method is the best approach when it comes to an agency working with rapid deliverables. Therefore, I’ll stick to using as little documentation as possible.

I’ll be using Figma as it is our team's current tool at OOZOU. However, it still works anywhere else with a bit of a tweak here and there. …


How to deal with misunderstandings in user research.

Welcome to the UX Myth blog series, where I debunk common design misunderstandings you keep hearing about in product meetings (and attempting to fix them).

In 1985, Coca-Cola (or Coke) introduced a new reformulation of its iconic drinks, dubbed “New Coke”. It went through thousands of “sip tests” and many iterations to carefully adjust the taste based on the supposed “customer” feedback. Despite all the positive feedback from testing before the initial launch, the New Coke turned out to be a total disaster — causing the company to lose millions of dollars in return. …


Get your magnifying glasses ready. We’re going in.

Welcome to the UX Myth blog series, where I debunk common design misunderstandings you keep hearing about in product meetings (and attempting to fix them).

Misconception About Font Size

The general public’s common perception would be that apps with smaller text sizes aim more towards a younger userbase and the larger ones are for the exact opposite audience. The notion gain its roots by these stakeholders “looking over the shoulders” of other people’s using other apps or browsing websites they’ve never used. Little did they know that those users expressly set up the phones to have a specific text sizing according to their preference.


Although we as designers can always use those dummy data via some data generator for the wireframes and mockups, having accurate test data for better contextual awareness could immensely speed the process.

Welcome to the UX Myth blog series, where I debunk common design misunderstandings you keep hearing about in product meetings (and attempting to fix them).

Dummy vs Test data

When people say dummy data, they often refer to a set of gibberish words that do not contain any valuable data but serve as a placeholder.

Designers usually resort to dummy data — those Lorem Ipsum you see on websites and design templates — whenever they’re unsure about information presented in the requirement (or lack thereof). Hoping that the actual content may (or may not) come later on in the process.


Your physical world’s subconscious is playing tricks with your mind.

Welcome to the UX Myth blog series, where I debunk common design misunderstandings you keep hearing about in product meetings (and attempting to fix them).

What Is White/Negative Space?

When creating any designs, most would resort to these spaces as “breathable spaces” where you intentionally leave out areas within the layout to signify the separation between contents.

The problem is, we are not used to this level of emptiness before.

The Human Adaptation For The Draught Of Spaces

As for all design-related subject, people perceive “emptiness” differently. Most people born from the pre-digital era mostly have everything in one, simple, carry-able spaces — a “TV Remote” solution — where every available input…


Enthusiastically alleviating complex design system’s hiccups, one effective team-wide workaround at a time. (Part 3 of 3)

Part III of III

The most important part of the entire product design process is handing off your designs to collect feedback from stakeholders.

Before Figma, the OOZOU design team had used stacks of tools to carry out our workload. Many of the tools we used had their own native ‘versioning’ control structure of some form, whether it be uploading the link to share or importing a Sketch artboard. Every tool had to be micro-managed individually and required constant attention from our design team.

When we fully committed to the Figma ecosystem, it started showing its magic as soon as your colleague began moving…


Enthusiastically alleviating complex design system’s hiccups, one effective team-wide workaround at a time. (Part 2 of 3) Read the first part here

Part II of III

This is part 2 of the 3 Design workarounds series where we will be providing the principles of a solution implemented exclusively across our Figma-based projects. Most of these tips should work on Sketch (and even on an imported Sketch file). However, if you find some of these workarounds harder to figure out, feel free to reach me down in the comment section and we could discuss it more!

Redundancy is — well — boring

Gavin Chiemsombat

Product Designer based in Thailand. Occasionally shows up just to geek about Figma. Contact me — ginksmokebacon@gmail.com

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